Which Is Better? Ribeye vs Sirloin Steak

ribeye vs sirloin

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Ribeye and sirloin are some of the most well-known cuts of steak, but a recognizable name doesn’t tell you much about their differences or how to prepare them. 

That’s where we come in.

We’ll be breaking down what sets these two amazing cuts of beef apart and showing you specific ways to prepare them to help you get the best from your steak.

What is a ribeye steak?

As you might guess from the name, the ribeye is taken from rib primal, specifically from ribs six through twelve. 

The ribeye is held up as one of the best steaks you can buy as it combines a healthy dose of marbling with a large fillet of the tender longissimus dorsi muscle.

raw ribeye steak on a white plate

The intramuscular fat that makes up the marbling helps keep the meat moist during cooking and enhances its flavor. Because the longissimus dorsi muscle doesn’t see much use during the animal’s life, it remains tender and has a deep beefy flavor.

Most ribeye steaks also come with a characteristic cap of the spinalis muscle, which is separated from the longissimus dorsi by a kernel of fat. 

The spinalis is heavily marbled and adds a rich, juicy, and flavorful element that, on its own, would be too fatty, but combines fantastically with the leaner meat of the rest of the cut. 

Ribeyes can be bought with or without the bone. The bone-in ribeye is commonly referred to as a cowboy steak, or tomahawk steak when the full length of the bone is left on.

and you might find the ribeye advertised as a Delmonico, Spencer, beauty steak, or a Scotch fillet.

What is a sirloin steak?

The sirloin is a larger subprimal cut that is often separated into a variety of other cuts, including roasts, the T-bone steak, and the top sirloin, which is the most common sirloin steak cut.

Compared to ribeye, sirloin is a much leaner cut of meat. It lacks the distinctive marbling and fatty cap of the ribeye, which means it isn’t as heavily flavored or as tender. 

raw sirloin chop on a metal surface

Trimmed of fat and connective tissue, sirloin steak is still packed with beefy flavor and has a characteristic chew without being tough. If you want a deeper flavor in your sirloin, then opt for a steak that has been dry-aged for at least 21-days.

Sirloin is an excellent choice if you want a tender and flavorsome steak without the ribeye’s high-fat content. You can sometimes find sirloin steaks advertised as New York Strip, Kansas City Strip, Omaha Strip, or a club steak.

Which is better – Ribeye or Sirloin?

Calling a specific steak cut “better” than another one is obviously a heavily subjective choice. However, if you’re struggling to choose between the ribeye and the sirloin, there are some key areas you can use to draw a comparison:  

Flavour and appearance

The depth of flavor associated with a specific steak cut is in direct proportion to the amount of fat it contains. Ribeye has significantly more marbling than sirloin steak and the fatty spinalis cap that increases the depth of its flavor. 

However, as we mentioned, dry-aging is a common technique used to increase the tenderness and flavor of beef steaks. So, if you want a rich beefy taste but don’t like fatty meat, you can always opt for a dry-aged sirloin for the best of both worlds. You can even use dry-aging bags to age your own steaks at home.

Price

There are several factors that influence the cost of a steak, including the breed of animal it comes from, its weight, and its USDA rating. However, as a general rule, the extra marbling of the ribeye means you’ll be paying more for it than a similarly sized sirloin steak.

Because the USDA rating system is based on the amount of marbling, and the ribeye is the cut used to determine the rating of the entire carcass, ribeye steaks are also more likely to be rated as ‘Prime,’ making them more expensive.

Health benefits

There are several health benefits associated with eating leaner beef and, if you are looking to reduce the fat in your diet without cutting down on your steak intake, then sirloin is a great choice.

Significantly leaner than a ribeye, top sirloin steak still retains its tenderness and taste without the intense marbling of its fattier counterpart.

Preparation

As you can see, the sirloin and the ribeye are distinctly different cuts of beef and they benefit from different preparation techniques. While there are many different ways you can prepare and cook both steaks, we’ve chosen two that we think bring out the best in these fantastic cuts.

Ribeye – Hot and Fast

The extra marbling and fatty cap of the ribeye mean it takes well to a simple high-heat sear. That extra fat keeps the meat juicy and helps form a delicious crispy crust that adds to its already rich flavor. 

cooked and sliced ribeye steak on a wooden board
  • If possible, prepare your steaks in advance by salting them thoroughly and leaving them uncovered in the refrigerator for around 24 hours. This helps to season the meat and dries out the surface, so you get a better sear. If you don’t have that kind of time, salt your meat just before it hits the pan or grill.
  • Heat your skillet or grill until it is smoking hot. If you’re using a skillet, add a little neutral oil to the pan to stop the meat from scorching. 
  • Throw your steaks on your cooking surface and cook, flipping once and only once, until it reaches an internal temperature of 130°F for a perfect medium-rare. Remember to take it off the heat at around 125°F as the internal temperature will continue to rise by up to 5°F after cooking.
  • Let the meat rest for a few minutes without covering it, as the steam will steal the crisp from your crust, and then tuck in.

Sirloin – The sous vide reverse sear

Because it lacks the fat of the ribeye, the top sirloin benefits from a more delicate approach. You can definitely still cook sear it on a grill, but using a technique like sous vide allows you to cook your steak to the perfect medium-rare, without the possibility of overcooking it.

cooked sirloin steak on a plate
Source: Flickr / syvwlch
  • As with the ribeye, if you have the time, prepare your steaks in advance by salting them thoroughly and leaving them uncovered in the refrigerator for around 24 hours.
  • Vacuum seal your steak and cook using sous vide at 130°F for a minimum of one hour and a maximum of four hours.
  • Remove the steak from its vacuum bag and leave to rest for around 10 minutes, covered, while you heat up your pan or grill. This will cool the meat and prevent it from overcooking when you sear it.
  • When your pan or grill is ripping hot, pat your steak dry with paper towels and place on the cooking surface, along with a little neutral oil if you’re using a skillet.
  • Cook for one minute on each side until the surface is crisp and brown.
  • Serve and enjoy immediately.

Wrapping it all up

Now you know all the essential facts, you’re ready to cook up whichever cuts appeal to you most. Whether it’s the lean and tender sirloin or the rich and juicy ribeye, using our suggested cooking techniques will allow you to get the best from these excellent cuts.

Do you have a preference between sirloin and ribeye? Perhaps you got the perfect preparation techniques for one, or both, of these cuts to share with the world? We’d love to hear about it in the comments section below. 

John McCloy

John McCloy

Formerly a brand manager for the UK high street, John gave up that life for the far less stressful job of running his own business. He now likes to spend as much of his free time as possible hunched over a grill, reading about grills, or staring forlornly out of a window as the British weather makes it impossible to use his grill."

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